First Impressions of EMC World

EMC World, EMC’s core annual conference is this week in Las Vegas and there are a number of very core things to watch out for. EMC’s presence in the enterprise space is legendary. However the enterprise space is gaining momentum in the enterprise IT evolution. The question is: Is EMC in a position to support these changes and continue to provide the leadership they’re known for. Bottom line: Companies are moving to the cloud. On the surface, this could present disaster for EMC. Key will be EMC’s ability to shift and help customers embrace the cloud.

Importance of Storage

Storage has grown up. No longer are the days where storage is just a place to store data and files. Storage is now key to the success of any given application. EMC clearly understands this and needs to evolve to this change. This is new! But it provides a radical shift in opportunity for companies like EMC. Look for EMC to make the connection between applications and storage.

Partnerships & Ecosystem Development

EMC provides leadership to enables IT to provide greater business value. The key is to evolve quickly and provide solutions that are needed both today and moving forward.

One could argue that no one company can (or should) be everything to everyone. Even very large enterprise providers such as EMC, need to embrace this shift. One example of EMC’s recent shift is their partnership with SAP. Frankly, this is a great sign of maturity on the part of EMC. Similarly, HP recently started providing their ‘Shark’ solutions for SAP’s HANA. Look for EMC to embrace this relationship and look to other key relationships between EMC and key enterprise players.

Open Source Software Integration

It is clear that open source software (like OpenStack) is changing the way enterprise solutions are built and consumed within a completely new economic model. The more mature enterprise-class providers will acknowledge this shift and embrace it. Look for EMC to provide greater integration with open source solutions.

Enterprise to Service Provider Shifts

Historically, enterprise-class providers create solutions specifically for enterprises…not service providers. Service provider requirements are quite different from that of their enterprise counterparts. At the same time, the shift in demand from enterprise to service provider happens over time, not all at once. Look for EMC to acknowledge this shift in terms of integration between solutions and changes in their management tools. The impact of general-purpose storage solutions also changes the paradigm for EMC. EMC needs to demonstrate value beyond the underlying physical hardware.

The VMware and Pivotal Impact

A constant question for EMC is how VMware and Pivotal play a role in EMC’s future. Both companies provide solutions that support the evolving changes within the enterprise. But potentially create a loggerhead for openness. Can EMC embrace the changes and innovation from both VMware and Pivotal, but still maintain flexibility in their open approach to alternative solutions? Look for indications of this through their partnerships and reference architectures.

Timing is Everything

EMC provides core storage solutions for key enterprise applications. In many ways, these are the very applications that are both sensitive to enterprises and harder to move. In both cases, this translates to risk. Enterprise customers have been hesitant to make the shift from traditional storage solutions to alternative approaches. That attitude is changing. Change is no longer an option it is a requirement. How is EMC taking a leadership role to help existing enterprise customers make this shift? Look for EMC to provide examples of flexibility beyond the traditional enterprise constraints.

In Summary

This year, more than any in the past, is a watershed year for EMC. This year, the stars are aligning where customers are open for change, looking for help and ready to get started. The traditional enterprise sacred cows are up for grab. Now is the time for EMC to demonstrate how they can make this shift and continue to provide leadership to the enterprise customer.

Initial Impressions from IBM Impact

This week is IBM’s Impact Conference in Las Vegas. In past years, IBM conveyed components of different strategies around Mobile and Cloud. However, they have since moved to an integrated approach. This integrated approach is great, but offers a few challenges for an incumbent such as IBM. Here are some things to watch for this week:

Hardware is King

Many of the conversations at Impact have mentioned IBM’s heritage and leadership in the hardware space. This year, IBM celebrates 50 years of the mainframe. And there is plenty of innovative work IBM is doing in the hardware space.

The question is not about IBM’s leadership in hardware. It is more around their longer-term vision. IBM is a company challenged with keeping existing customers engaged (many of which are hardware customers), while engaging an even strong software and services story. The days of the general purpose processor that supports a myriad of applications is less important than specific infrastructure geared toward highly specialized workloads that run at scale.

The Shift in Enterprise Demand

Enterprises are still buying hardware today. But the demand for hardware is shifting from enterprises to service providers. As such, providers like IBM must evolve their software, management and tools to support the change in customers. This impacts the usability for enterprises and service providers alike. And vendors like IBM need to both acknowledge these shifts…and have an answer to the demand.

The Converged Story

Many want to talk about mobile and cloud in specific silos. IBM has been no different in the past. However, at Impact this week, IBM is talking the converged story around both mobile and cloud. This is a key shift in thinking that mirrors the holistic thinking any enterprise should take.

The SoftLayer Parlay

IBM’s acquisition of SoftLayer presented a brilliant opportunity to build a platform for the future. IBM needs to continue innovating and leveraging the SoftLayer platform in a myriad of ways that accommodates the varied requirements of customers (both current and potential).

OpenPOWER Foundation

This week, IBM is promoting their OpenPOWER Foundation pretty heavily. While this is a great move in the right direction, the branding might be off-putting for potential new customers looking for an ecosystem that is less tied to IBM’s hardware heritage. Look for further distinctions to be made in this space as IBM evolves.

Hybrid & Holistic

Finally, moving away from a silo approach, look for IBM to take a holistic approach to embracing both hybrid cloud and mobile strategies. Again, this mirrors where enterprises today need to go. Not necessarily where they are today. But that provides opportunity for IBM to take a leadership position in the industry.

The Cloud Storage Wars Heat Up

While the cloud storage wars have simmered between Box and Dropbox for sometime, someone just poured gas on the fire. And that someone is Microsoft. With today’s announcement, Microsoft has just put Box and Dropbox in their crosshairs.

The competition becomes particularly interesting as Box and Dropbox are both planning a public offering. At the same time, potential investors are questioning the sustainability of a standalone cloud storage business.

Today’s announcement increases Microsoft’s cloud storage offering (OneDrive) from 25GB per user to 1TB per user. This brings it on par with the business offerings of Box and Dropbox. At 25GB per user, the amount of storage available was interesting, but could lead to challenges for the largest consumers of storage in an average enterprise.

Comparison of Cloud Storage for Business

Company Storage Price
Microsoft 1TB $5/user/month*
Box 1TB $15/user/month
Dropbox Unlimited $15/user/month

* Microsoft OneDrive for Business is also included in Office 365 plans as low as $5-8/user/month

Data as of 4/29/2014

 

The Enterprise Effect

As more business customers move to cloud-based services, email becomes an early target. Exchange and Windows are still the standard for most companies today. This installed base has a huge effect on the potential outcome. Switching to alternative platforms can present a challenge on top of all other challenges an IT organization faces.

The Holistic Approach

While Microsoft’s solution is fairly closed and Microsoft-centric, this is not much different from what enterprises have faced for some time. In some ways, if an enterprise could ‘forklift’ their entire operation to a holistic solution for fundamental services (ie: Email, Storage, etc), that could present an attractive solution.

But that’s not the entire story. Companies today are looking to break the reigns of constrictive, closed ecosystems. That’s where Box and Dropbox excel beyond that of Microsoft. In any case, both Box and Dropbox will need to respond appropriately. The real opportunity for these companies is well beyond that of file storage.

For customers, the question of which solution to use comes down to your individual situation and which approach makes more sense both short-term and long-term.

Further Reading:

Microsoft Targets Box, Dropbox

http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2014/04/28/microsoft-targets-box-dropbox/

Microsoft Blog: Thinking outside the box

http://blogs.office.com/2014/04/28/thinking-outside-the-box/

Box Blog: An Open Microsoft

http://blog.box.com/2014/04/an-open-microsoft/

Can Microsoft Maintain Enterprise Interest Through Cloud and Mobile?

The past 60 days or so have shown a wave of changes at Microsoft. But are they enough to maintain interest by enterprise customers that Microsoft has long since courted…and counted on for the bulk of their revenue?

Revenue Breakdown

About a third of Microsoft’s revenue comes from their Business Division. A quarter comes from their Server and Tools Division and another quarter from their Business Division. The rest of the software giant’s $77.8 billion in revenue comes from Entertainment and Online Services (ie: Bing & MSN). Revenue from Microsoft’s Azure cloud service falls under their Server and Tools Division while their Office 365 cloud service falls under the Business Division category. The question is: Can Microsoft shift gears to replace diminishing traditional software with services such as 365 and Azure. In order to answer that question, Microsoft’s cloud strategy becomes front and center.

New CEO at the Helm

Next year will mark Microsoft’s 40th anniversary since their founding in 1975. Roughly 60 days ago, Microsoft announced a new CEO, Satya Nadella. Nadella is only the third CEO to lead Microsoft during their almost 40-year history. A long time Microsoft employee of over 20 years, Nadella has lead different parts of the organization most recently leading Microsoft’s Cloud and Enterprise Group. It is this last assignment that may be the most critical to his (and Microsoft’s) success moving forward.

Microsoft’s Halo is Strong

No, not that Halo. The halo effect from Microsoft’s existing enterprise business and relationships is strong and not expected to erode any time soon. In order to understand this further, one can look at the percentage of desktop operating system (OS) market share that Microsoft currently commands.
os_market_share_december_2013

Credit: The Next Web

Beyond desktop operating systems, Microsoft is still the dominant player in the productivity suite…by a long margin.

prod_suite_adoption

Credit: Forrester

Desktop OS and Productivity Suite are foundational to any enterprise customer. The relationship Microsoft garners with enterprise customers is strong and wide. And the value of those relationships is a gold mine that any provider today would kill to have. The question really comes back to Microsoft’s ability to convert customers from traditional software users to next generation users of cloud and mobile centric solutions.

The End of the XP Era

Well, not really. Yes, Microsoft ends support tomorrow for XP, but there is still quite a bit of the XP operating system in use between corporate systems and embedded within products. According to many, XP’s percent of desktop market share still hovers near 30%. It will take quite a while (read: years) to completely replace those systems. In the meantime, expect to see an increase in compromises through those unprotected systems.

Turning a Battleship in a Bathtub

Bringing in a new CEO that appreciates both Microsoft’s history and the new cloud centric world was a key move for Microsoft. If there was a time for Microsoft to change, now is that time. At the recent BUILD conference, Microsoft expressed their understanding of the importance from cloud and mobile. With Nadella at the helm charged with a background in cloud, the next few months will be critical to prove his ability to start the transformation of a giant. Customers will want to watch Microsoft’s next moves closely as it should set both the tone and cadence of future moves.

4 Reasons Cloud Storage is Not a Bubble About to Pop

With the recent S-1 filing by Box for their Initial Public Offering (IPO) the question of a Cloud Storage Bubble is raised once again. But is it really a bubble? And should enterprise customers take note and run for the hills? There is more at stake than what appears on the surface.

Box Files Form S-1 IPO

By Box filing their S-1, their financials are put on display for all to scrutinize. Within those figures, we learn that their 34k+ paying customers contribute $124m in revenue that offsets operational costs to the tune of a $169m loss last fiscal year. Over the past four years of reporting, Box reported an increase in the loss trend. But is this enough to consider impending doom?

Cloud Storage Startup Landscape

In 2013, Nirvanix (another cloud storage startup) closed up shop and sent their customers scrambling. Dropbox is another of the closest competitors to Box and announced their intent to IPO as well. Could Box and Dropbox be following in Nirvanix’ footsteps? Enterprise storage is expensive. Yes, there are economies of scale and tricks you can play to maximize the efficiency, but storage infrastructure is expensive.

So, let’s take a look at some potential hypothesis on what may be occurring:

Hypothesis One: There is a minimum amount of capital required to achieve profitability.

Nirvanix only took on $70m while Box and Dropbox took on $414m and $607m respectively. Consider that enterprises need stability in their cloud storage provider, a substantial number of enterprise features (ie: auth, security) and a solid ecosystem for integration. It is probable that $70m is not enough to reach ‘escape velocity’ in this space. It is possible that $400-600m may not be enough either. It is also likely that scale plays a significant role too. It will be interesting to see Dropbox’ figures when they file their S-1.

Hypothesis Two: The real value for cloud storage is not in unstructured file storage.

Sure, the ability to store, share and collaborate on files online is valuable. However, is there greater value in the meta-data that comes from understanding the behaviors of those files? Plus, similar to the problem email systems and enterprise storage vendors addressed years ago with data de-duplication, there is value to managing files at scale. Not to mention that the meta-data around that data could be repurposed for other functions.

Hypothesis Three: Unstructured file storage is simply a loss leader.

There are many directions a company like Box or Dropbox could take based on their current service offerings. Of course there are many directions this could take, but that is for a future discussion.

Hypothesis Four: The shifting enterprise storage paradigm will not allow cloud storage failure.

It is simple enough to treat all storage the same, but in reality it is not that easy. Traditional methods for storing files on internal storage sub-systems is cumbersome at best when we move into a SMAC (social, mobile, analytics, cloud) based world. Enterprises are already shifting toward cloud-based storage to alleviate the pressure and shift their paradigm. The thought of having to move back to traditional methods would break many apps and services. In the end, enterprises really need to move forward and are not able to go back.

Consider the Options

On the surface, it may appear that Box (and ostensibly Dropbox) may be losing money today, there is much more at stake. Enterprises know they need to make a shift to a SMAC based world too. The cards appear to point favorably in the direction of additional options beyond the currently cloud storage portfolio offering. I would look more toward the future opportunities of the space through one of the four hypotheses and less on the impending implosion.

The Shark of HP Converged Systems

The story of Converged Infrastructure (CI) continues to gain steam within the Information Technology (IT) industry…and for good reason. Converged solutions present a relatively easy way to manage complex infrastructure solutions. While some providers focus on CI as an opportunity to bundle solutions into a single SKU, companies such as Nutanix and HP have produced solutions for a couple of years now that go much further with true integration.

As enterprise IT customers shift their focus away from infrastructure and toward platforms, application and data, expect the CI space to heat up. Part of this shift includes platforms geared toward specific applications. This is especially true for those operating applications at scale.

Last week, HP announced their ‘shark’ approach of hardware solutions geared toward specific applications. One of the first targets is the SAP HANA application using HP Converged System 500 as part of a co-innovation project between HP & SAP. It is interesting to see HP partner with SAP HANA with so much emphasis on data analytics today. In addition, specialized solutions are becoming increasingly more important in this space.

Enterprise IT organizations need the ability to start small and grow accordingly. Even service providers may consider a start-small and grow approach. Michael Krigsman (@mkrigsman) recently wrote a post outlining how IT projects are getting smaller and still looking for relief. HP expressed their intent to provide scalable solutions that start small and include forthcoming ‘Project Kraken’ solutions later this year. Only time will tell how seamless this transition becomes.

Additional Reading:

HP CS Blog Entry:

http://h30507.www3.hp.com/t5/Converged-Infrastructure/HP-ConvergedSystem-for-SAP-HANA-meet-the-industry-s-most/ba-p/157176#.UynDsdy0bfM

IBM Dev@Pulse Conference Impressions

The Dev@Pulse conference is IBM’s developer conference tagging onto the core IBM Pulse conference. This is IBM’s first year trying to hold a developer-centric conference (Dev@Pulse) alongside their flagship cloud conference (IBM Pulse). Dev@Pulse is about as far away physically as you can get from the main conference and held in a nightclub rather than conference center. While Hakkasan LV Nightclub is a trendy choice to hold a developer summit, the attendance seemed thin and pulled from the existing IBM user base.

In talking with folks at the event, it seems IBM is trying new things like lightning talks, demos and a playground to woo developers. There are several labs to choose from too. In talking with devs prior to the event, many of them had not hear of Pulse, let alone Dev@Pulse. This seems like a miss on IBM’s part to attract new developers to the IBM ecosystem. After attending several sessions at Dev@Pulse, I’d say that it has the makings of a decent developer conference.

A good example was IBM’s technical rundown of the just-announced IBM BlueMix. The session went soup-to-nuts on how to deploy an app using BlueMix as a great summary introduction of how BlueMix works and how to deploy an app using the new service. However, only 50 or so folks were in attendance for the talk here at Dev@Pulse. One presenter even asked the audience how many are Cobol programmers and several raised their hands. That is a very different crowd from the typical Node.js, Rails, Python crowd.

On the other hand, IBM is identifying the need to bridge the gap between cloud-based apps and traditional apps. They also note that the challenge is in extensively leveraging APIs. The API economy is a reality…not just with IBM but in the industry today. That’s pretty forward thinking (and refreshing) for a traditional enterprise organization like IBM. The question will be: How to get the permeation through the rest of the organization beyond just BlueMix and SoftLayer.

Trying to attract developers to a conference like IBM Pulse or Dev@Pulse will be hard to do in isolation. There are a number of other efforts in terms of location, audience, social impact and content that IBM needs to address in order to make significant, sustaining waves.

IBM Pulse Conference Impressions

IBM’s conference on cloud is taking place this week in Las Vegas at the MGM Convention Center. There are two core parts to the conference; The main Pulse general conference and the Dev@Pulse conference which is specifically targeting developers. The two conferences are…and feel…completely separate from one another.

IBM Pulse Core
The main IBM Pulse conference is IBM’s rebranding of their past Tivoli conference into a cloud conference. Pulse 2014 is branded as ‘The Premier Cloud Conference’. I’m not sure I would go that far, but it’s much more than that. IBM is bringing much more of their software portfolio to bear. Having attended, keynoted and presented at a number of cloud conferences around the globe, this one takes on quite a different vibe. It’s far more subdued and less energetic than its cloud rivals. That could stem from IBM past culture creeping forward. But there are many trying to shed the IBM of old for a fresh and modern perspective. Just talking with folks around the room, it’s clear that the individuals want to turn the corner, but it’s hard to turn a battleship in a bathtub. Changing culture is hard.

The presentations have been a mix of lukewarm depth and buzzword bingo. While the right things are being stated and the cloud-centric focus is decent, it is unclear the impact IBM has for its customers. This seems to be a pretty significant gap for IBM to fill in the coming months. One area IBM needs to address is how to attract new developers and customers. Looking around the room, 1/2 of the gentlemen are in suits while the other 1/2 are simply jacket-less. You rarely see the jeans, tee shirt or hoodie walking the floor. This speaks more to IBM’s current user base that the new millennials that are the real x-factor in cloud development today.

And speaking of developers, IBM’s Dev@Pulse developer conference is happening in tandem with IBM Pulse. More on Dev@Pulse and IBM Pulse perspectives coming soon!

Who are the biggest cloud providers?

Cloud computing has taken off like wildfire. In that vein there is a bit of discrepancy between who the largest cloud company is and isn’t. Is perception reality? One could argue that perception is reality. And the perception today is that Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) is the largest. That may be the perception, but the reality is far different.

Amazon by the Numbers

Today, Amazon’s market cap is $180 billion. In fiscal 2012, Amazon reported $61 billion in revenue. In Nov 2013, Alex Williams (@alexwilliams) of TechCrunch reported that the AWS (Amazon’s Web Services) portion is “…widely believed to be a $3.5 billion business.” That is a substantial business on its own, but pales in comparison with the revenue from the rest of the Amazon portfolio; namely amazon.com. Meaning, AWS may account for less than 6% of Amazon’s total revenue.

Largest Cloud Computing Providers

Now let’s look at the larger, publicly traded companies that focus on cloud computing solely:

Market Cap (as of Jan 24, 2014)

Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) = $379 billion

Salesforce (NYSE:CRM) = $36 billion

LinkedIn (NYSE:LNKD) = $25 billion

Workday (NYSE:WDAY) = $16 billion

NetSuite (NYSE:N) = $8 billion

ServiceNow (NYSE:NOW) = $8 billion

Concur (NASDAQ:CNQR) = $6 billion

Now, these are closer to pure-play cloud providers. Meaning, their only business is cloud-based services. And they don’t represent two other groups: Diversified public companies and privately held companies.

Diversified Cloud Companies

While cloud computing may not be their primary source of revenue, one can not exclude this group from the mix. Some of the larger companies include:

Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) = $309 billion -> 365, Dynamics, Azure

Oracle (NYSE:ORCL) = $168 billion -> Cloud

SAP (NYSE:SAP) = $92 billion -> Cloud

IBM (NYSE:IBM) = $196 billion -> SoftLayer

HP (NYSE:HPQ) = $55 billion -> Cloud

Verizon (NYSE:VZ) = $137 billion -> Terremark

Rackspace (NYSE:RAX) = $5 billion -> Cloud

The revenue from cloud alone from each of these companies can easily reach into the billions of dollars.

Privately Held Cloud Companies

Aside from publicly traded companies, there are a number of privately held companies. Some of which are startups. Of late, companies such as Box and Dropbox have received valuations of $2 billion and $8 billion respectively. And this is before they go IPO.

Perception vs. Reality

The point is, Amazon’s AWS may garner the 800lb gorilla perception, but there are a number of other viable and larger cloud providers in the market today. And this doesn’t account for the up-and-coming providers that could provide Amazon with some healthy competition.

Are Enterprises Prepared for the Data Tsunami?

Companies are in for a major change to how they operate, manage and leverage data in the coming years. Data is quickly becoming the new currency and leading businesses are looking for ways to capitalize on this change.

The Data Deluge Problem

A recent IDC report on data suggests the sheer amount of data generated doubles every two years. By the year 2020, the total amount of data will equate to 40,000 exabytes or 40 trillion gigabytes. To put in perspective, that’s more than 5,200 gigabytes for every man, woman and child in 2020.

However, the problem is not the data itself. The problem rests with how and what to do with the data. To complicate matters, much of the data generated comes from new sources such as wearable devices, mobile devices, social media and machine data.

Social Data Streams

The impact from social media is significant on its own:

Twitter: 400 millions tweets per day

Facebook: 4.75 billion content items shared per day

According to one whitepaper, Facebook currently houses more than 250 petabytes of data with .5 petabytes of new data arriving every day. Facebook and Twitter only represent two of the more popular social data sources yet there are many more.

IoT and Machine Data

A relatively recent source of data is coming from the Internet of Things (IoT). IoT represents a collection of uniquely identifiable items. Individually, these items generate their own sets of data. Data may also come in the form of ‘machine data’ or industrial data, which is generated through the use of equipment.

For example, GE’s GEnx next generation turbofan engines found on Boeing 787 and 747-8 aircraft contain some 5,000 data points that are analyzed every second. Put that into perspective. According to Wipro research, a single cross-country flight across the United States generates 240TB of data. The average Boeing 737 engine generates 10 terabytes every 30 minutes of flight.

Using a bit of math, the problem becomes fairly apparent. Using data from MIT’s Airline Data Project and the total number of Boeing 787’s in use as of December 31, 2013, the problem becomes:

Total data generated every day by the global 787 fleet in operation today:

(20TB/ hr x 9hr ave operation per day) x 2 engines x 114 787 aircraft = 41,040 terabytes (or 40 petabytes)

For Southwest Airlines alone, their data challenge is more significant:

Total data generated every day by Southwest Airlines’ fleet of 607 Boeing 737 aircraft:

(20TB/ hr x 10.8hr ave operation per day) x 2 engines x 607 737 aircraft = 262,224 terabytes (or 256 petabytes)

256 petabytes is a lot of data. GE included a couple more examples of Industrial Data in “The Case for an Industrial Big Data Platform.” From these examples, the sheer amount of data from IoT and machine data becomes clearly apparent. And these examples only highlight a small, specific use-case that does not take into account other aspects of the airline industry.

Not All Data is Equal

In many cases, unlike traditional enterprise data, which is structured in nature, these new sources of data reside in many forms and are typically unstructured. This presents a challenge to traditional data warehouses that are accustom to consuming and managing structured data.

When thinking about how to ‘consume’ these new sources of data, several key considerations reside with the data itself. Much of the data, in essence, has a half-life that drives its value over time. An important consideration is in which data to keep and for how long. The challenge is in knowing now what data might be needed in the future. That is easier said than done.

The default action taken by many enterprises today is to simply keep all data, which is costly just for the storage in which to house it. Unfortunately, this is leading to ‘data landfills’ of mixed data with varying degrees of value. As the volume of data increases, so will the landfills unless a different approach is taken.

The Holy Grail of Data Correlation

In addition to stockpiling data, the real value for many will come in the form of correlation. Leveraging one data stream provides valuable insight. However, when paired or correlated with multiple data streams, a much clearer picture becomes visible.

Think of the value to a company when they can compare social data, operational data and transaction data. For many marrying these data streams present multiple challenges. Now imagine that the number of streams (sources) along with the volume of data is increasing. It becomes clear how the problem gets pretty complicated pretty quickly.

Consumer vs. Corporate

From the increase in consumer adoption of devices and services over the past few years, it is clear that consumers are ready to generate more data. Enterprises need to prepare for the oncoming onslaught.

As consumers, we want enterprises to succeed in leveraging the data we provide. Take healthcare for example. Imagine if healthcare providers could correlate data between lab results, pharmacy data, claims data and social media streams. The outcome might be pre-emptive diagnosis based on trends of epidemics and illness across the globe. In addition, the results would be highly personalized and overall lower the cost of healthcare. If done, it would present significant economic and social improvements.

The Data Driven Economy

In summary, the onslaught from data is both concerning and exciting at the same time. The potential information generated from the data presents major opportunities across industries from providing greater work efficiency to saving lives. Business, as a whole, is becoming even more reliant on information and therefore data-driven. Data ultimately provides greater insight, personalization, and accuracy for business decisions.

It is important for enterprises to quickly evaluate new methods for data consumption and management. The success or failure of companies may very well reside in their ability to address the data tsunami.