Business · Data

Understanding the value of data integration

To understand the value of data integration, one has to first understand the changing data landscape. In the past few years, more data has been created than existed in all of time prior to that. In 2014, I penned a post asking ‘Are enterprises prepared for the data tsunami’? When it comes to data, enterprises of all sizes and maturity face two core issues: 1) How to effectively manage the sheer volume of data in a meaningful way and 2) How to extract insights from the data. Unfortunately, the traditional ways to manage data start to break down when considering these new challenges.

DIVERSE DATA SETS

In the above-mentioned post, there was reference to an IDC report suggesting that by 2020, the total amount of data will equate to 40,000 exabytes or 40 trillion gigabytes. That is more than 5,200 gigabytes for every man, woman and child in 2020.

However, unlike data in the past, this new data will come from an increasingly varied list of sources. Some of the data will be structured. Other data will be unstructured. And then there is meta data that is derived through analysis of these varied data sets. All of which needs to be leveraged by the transformational enterprise.

In the past, one might have pooled all of this data into a classic data warehouse. Unfortunately, many of the new data types do not fit nicely into this approach. Then came the data lake as a solution to simply pool all of this data. Unfortunately, this approach is also met with challenges as many enterprises are seeing their data lakes turn into data swamps.

Even beyond data generated internally enterprises are increasing their reliance on externally sourced data. Since this data is not created by the enterprise, there are limits on how the data is leveraged. In addition, simply bringing all of this data into the enterprise is not that simple. Nor is it feasible.

Beyond the concept of different data sets, these new data sets create ‘data gravity’ as they grow in size. Essentially, creating a stronger bond between the data set and the application that leverages it. As the size of the data set grows, so does its ‘gravity’ which prevents movement. All of these reasons create significant friction to considering any movement of data.

VALUE OF INTEGRATING DATA

The solution rests with data integration. Essentially, leave data where it resides and leverage integration methods to the various data sets in order to create insights. There are actually two components when considering how to integrate data.

There is a physical need for data integration and one that is more logical in nature. The physical component is how to physically connect the different data sources together. This is easier said than done. It was already challenging when we managed all of the data within the enterprise. Today, the data resides in the hands of many other players and approaches. This can add complexity to the integration efforts. Modern data integration methods rely on Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to create these integration points. In addition, there are security ramifications to consider too.

The logical integration of data often centers around the customer. One of the core objectives for enterprises today is customer engagement. Enterprises are finding ways to learn more about their customer in an effort to build a more holistic profile that ultimately leads to a stronger relationship. Not all of that data is sourced internally. This really is a case of 1+1=3 where even smaller insights can lead to a larger impact when combined.

THE INTERSECTION OF DATA INTEGRATION AND ADVANCED FUNCTIONS

Data integration is a deep and complicated subject that is evolving quickly. Newer advancements in the Artificial Intelligence (AI) space are leading enterprises to gain greater insights that even they didn’t think about. Imagine a situation where you thought you knew your customer, but the system suggested other aspects that weren’t considered. AI has the opportunity to significantly augment the human capability to create more accurate insights and faster.

Beyond AI, other newer functions such as Machine Learning (ML) and Internet of Things (IoT) present new sources of data to further enhance insights. It should be noted that nether ML nor IoT are able to function in a meaningful way without leveraging data integration.

DATA INTEGRATION LEADS TO SPEED AND INSIGHTS…AND CHALLENGES

Enterprises that leverage AI and ML to augment their efforts find increased value from both the insights and the speed in which they respond. In today’s world where speed and accuracy are becoming a strong differentiation for competitors, leveraging as much data as possible is key. In order to leverage the sheer amount of data, enterprises must leverage data integration to remain competitive.

At the same time, enterprises are facing challenges from new regulations such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). There are many facets and complexities to GDPR that will only further the complexities for data integration and management.

While enterprises may have leveraged custom approaches to solve the data integration problem in the past, today’s complexities demand a different approach. The combination of these challenges push enterprises to leverage advanced tools to assist in the integration of data to gain greater insights.

 

This post sponsored by:

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https://www.sap.com/intelligentdata

Business · Cloud · Data

Rubrik continues their quest to protect the enterprise

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Data protection is all the rage right now. With data moving beyond the corporate data center to multiple locations including cloud, the complexity has increased significantly. What is Data Protection? It generally covers a combination of backup, restore, disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity (BC). While not new, most enterprises have struggled for decades to effectively backup their systems in a way that ensures that a) the data is protected, b) can be restored if needed and c) can be restored in a timely fashion when needed. Put a different way: BC/DR is still one of most poorly managed parts of an IT operation. Add cloud to this and one can see where the wheels start to fall off.

The irony is that, while not new, enterprises struggle to effectively balance the needs of DR/BC in a meaningful way. The reasons for this are longer than this blog will permit. This is an industry screaming for disruption. Enter Rubrik.

RUBRIK BRINGS A FRESH PERSPECTIVE TO AN OLD PROBLEM

A couple of weeks back, I caught up with the Rubrik team at Tech Field Day’s Cloud Field Day 3. Rubrik came into the market a few years back and has continued their drive to solve this old, but growing problem.

Unlike traditional solutions, Rubrik takes a modern approach to their architecture. Everything that Rubrik does calls an API. By using this API-centric architecture, Rubrik provides modularity and flexibility to their approach. API-centric architectures are a must in a cloud-based world.

At Cloud Field Day, the Rubrik team went through their new SaaS-based solution called Polaris. Knowing that enterprise data is increasingly being spread across multiple data centers and cloud providers, they need a cohesive way to visually manage their data. Polaris is a SaaS-based solution that does just that. Polaris becomes the overarching management platform in which to effectively manage the growing complexity.

COMPLEXITY DRIVES THE NEED FOR A NEW APPRAOCH

There are two dynamics that are driving these changes: 1) the explosion in data growth and 2) the need to effective management data. As applications and their data move to a myriad of different solutions, so does the need to effectively manage the underlying data.

An increase in compliance and regulatory requirements are just adding further complexity to data management. As the complexity grows, so does the need for systemic automation. No longer are we able to simply throw more resources at the problem. It is time to turn the problem on its head and leverage new approaches.

DATA PROTECTION IS NOT IMPORTANT…UNTIL IT IS

During the discussion, Rubrik’s Chief Technologist Chris Wahl made a very key observation that everyone in IT painfully understands: Data protection is not important…until it is. To many enterprises, the concept of data protection is seen as an insurance policy that you hopefully will not need. However, in today’s world of increasingly regulated and highly complicated architectures with data spreading out at scale, the risks are simply too great to ignore.

While data protection may have been less important in the past, today it is critical.

GOING BEYOND SIMPLY BACKUP AND RECOVERY

If the story about Rubrik were to stop with just backup and recovery, it would still be impressive. However, Rubrik is venturing into the complexity that comes with integration into other systems and processes. One of the first areas is their integration with ServiceNow. Rubrik integrates with ServiceNow by ingesting CMDB data into the system. By doing so, it provides a cohesive look at the underlying components that Rubrik has visibility into.

Looking into the crystal ball, one can start to see how Rubrik is fully understanding that backup and recovery is just the start. The real opportunity comes from full integration into business processes. However, in order to do that, integrations like ServiceNow are needed. Expect to see more as Rubrik continues their quest to provide a solid foundation to the enterprise when they need it most.

Business · CIO

HP’s composable story addresses the evolving enterprise

Last week, HP Enterprise (HPE) pulled together a number of influencers from around North America for a unique event. Unlike most events that talk about specific products or announcements, this event was quite different. This event dug into HPE’s direction around ‘composable’ infrastructure and how it addresses the needs of the evolving enterprise organization.

WHAT IS COMPOSABLE

We have heard about composable concepts for some time. HPE’s approach is to apply the composable concept to that of infrastructure by assembling compute, storage and networking resources for the benefit of a given set of applications. An application, via HPE’s Application Program Interface (API) is able to pull together resources as needed. When they are no longer required, the resources go back into the ‘resource pools’.

Now some may scoff at the notion and suggest this is nothing new. They would be right except for one little twist that makes a big difference. HPE’s approach addresses the broader needs of the enterprise and disparate applications…using a single infrastructure solution.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

HPE’s Project Synergy was announced at HP Discover in Las Vegas in June and the approach is fairly straightforward. A single infrastructure stack that addresses the needs for all types of applications. That does not mean a separate stack for legacy applications from the stack that supports newer applications. It means that there is a single infrastructure stack that supports all types of applications…on the same stack.

The resources (compute, storage, network) sit in resource pools within the stack. As an application spins up, it addresses the API at which point the resources are composed for that application. When the resources are no longer needed, they return to their respective resource pools ready for the next application. As an example, resources might be used for a legacy application one minute, return to the pool and then recomposed for a new style of application only to return to the pool and be used for yet another application.

WHAT THIS MEANS FOR THE ENTERPRISE

By using a single infrastructure stack for all types of applications, customers are no longer worried about stranded resources as applications move from legacy to newer architectures. Resources are immediately available for repurpose via the resource pools.

Historically, enterprises faced a myriad of infrastructure stacks to support the varied application styles. As we see applications leverage new styles of architectures, the number of potential stacks under the traditional approach leads to increased complexity. By sharing resources through application pools and composability, it allows enterprises to focus less on infrastructure and focus further up in the application stack which is closer to the true business engagement.