5 Tectonic Shifts facing today’s CIO

The past several years have presented an interesting time for CIOs, their staff and the companies they work within. In many ways, the changes are significant shifts how companies have operated.

IT has a history of tectonic shifts

Tectonic shifts are not new. In just the past 25 years, we have seen many major shifts in the way we operate. Many of the changes were about technology. But others directly impacted how we think of and consume technology. Here are just a few:

  1. Distributed Computing: Moving from centralized mainframe computers that took up entire rooms to small computers that could fit on a desk. The smaller size presented greater processing capabilities at a fraction of the cost. This trend has continued right down to the very smartphone we carry today.
  2. Internet: There was a time when companies actually believed the Internet was a non-essential connection. A gimmick of sorts. Today, a company would have a hard time surviving without connecting to the Internet.
  3. Virtualization: Virtualization presented the opportunity to do two core things: 1) create abstraction between the application and hardware and 2) more fully utilize resources. This provided greater flexibility and utilization.
  4. Cloud Computing: The advent of cloud presented the opportunity to take virtualization to a whole new level through the abstraction of resources and ownership. Now, a company can operate while abstracting from the physical resources. In essence, cloud presents a significant leverage point for organizations.

Each of these shifts passed through a period of disbelief, challenge and eventually acceptance. Arguably, one could suggest that cloud still sits on the precipice of acceptance. However, each has also become a core foundation to today’s computing environment.

Today, there are a number of new tectonic shifts in flight. Each shift follows a similar path of disbelief, challenge and will eventually gain acceptance.

The five tectonic shifts facing today’s CIO

  1. The IT customer is the company’s customer: Technically, this has always been the case. It may have come through a secondary source: The internal user. Many IT organizations still believe their customer is the internal user. Today’s IT organization needs to think about how IT supports the company’s customer. That’s not to say that the internal user is not important. But supporting the internal user is in concert with supporting the external customer. It also positions IT to align with other departments within the company.
  2. Consumers drive business behaviors: This could be seen as a ‘who-drives-who’ statement. The reality is that consumer behaviors are driving business behaviors. One can look to several examples to support this:
    1. Cloud: Gmail, Yahoo, Netflix, Dropbox.
    2. Mobile: Smartphones, tablets and wearables.
    3. Speed: Real-time satisfaction of results, information and access.

To understand where we are going, just look toward the next generation of millennials, digital natives and ultimately, children. Understand how the next generation is adopting technology and adapt accordingly.

  1. Real-time replaces batch process: Many core IT processes follow a batch processing methodology. However, today’s business is moving toward real-time access to information and analytics. Speed is the keyword here and plays into the consumer/ customer drive for real-time satisfaction.
  2. Transformational CIOs replace Traditional CIOs: This is probably one of the most sensitive shifts to discuss. Transformation CIOs are business leaders first that happen to have responsibility for technology. They understand how the company makes and spends money at an intimate level. Traditional CIOs are more technology-focused.
  3. IT becomes a business organization that happens to have responsibility for technology: IT (and the CIO as its leader) needs to become a business organization from top-to-bottom. Each function must consider the business value of their actions and the best course to take.

Reaching for the stars

There is no question that these shifts (like those in the past) will rock IT to the core. We can expect each to follow the same sequence of disbelief, challenge and acceptance. In fact, a small number of CIOs are already well down this path. The reality is that technology, or how it is used, is changing right around us.

Now is absolutely the best time to be in IT. It is also the scariest for IT folks and the stakes are only increasing. The hope is that IT (as a profession) and the CIO see the future and aim for the stars. The future is brighter than ever.

Originally published @ Gigaom Research 12/15/2014

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/12/5-tectonic-shifts-facing-todays-cio/

HP charts a course for the enterprise CIO from the inside out

Last week, HP (NYSE: HPQ) held their Discover Conference in Barcelona, Spain and the first since announcing their split into two major technology companies. Post split, HP Enterprise, the half focused on enterprise-class solutions, will need to demonstrate a strong leadership position to remain relevant in the dynamic and ever-changing enterprise space. Not a short order for such a large incumbent as HP. The split, however, brings into focus a renewed vigor to go after the enterprise CIO.

Looking inside to look outside

Over the past two years, HP assembled a powerhouse of CIO talent. The talent is not an advisory council, but rather executive leadership within the HP machine. In August 2012, HP went outside to hire Ramon Baez as their Global CIO. Previously, Baez was Vice President and CIO at Kimberly Clark. Then, in July 2014, HP made two other significant CIO hires. Former Clorox SVP & CIO Ralph Loura joined HP as CIO of HP’s Enterprise Group. At the same time, HP hired Paul Chapman as CIO of HP Software. Paul was formerly VP of Global Infrastructure & Cloud Operations at VMware. All three are highly respected among both their CIO peers and fellow executive colleagues. And one only needs to spend a few minutes with each to see how their thinking aligns with HP’s vision of the New Style of IT.

In their former roles, all three individuals accomplished many of the very activities that HP is helping their customers with today. For HP as a provider of products, solutions and services, it only needs to look internally to gain insight on which direction to take. Think of it as having the inside track on the transformational CIO.

On day one of the conference, I had the opportunity to join Paul Chapman and Paul Muller, VP of Strategic Marketing, HP Software to discuss The Evolving CIO.

Emphasis on cloud and big data

At Discover Barcelona, HP’s Helion cloud solutions and Haven data solutions were front-and-center at the front of each exhibit hall.

FullSizeRender-1 FullSizeRender-2

HP’s Helion cloud division continued their beat toward an OpenStack based ecosystem. The group, soon to be lead by former Eucalyptus CEO Marten Mickos, is placing a strong showing behind the OpenStack platform with solutions that address the enterprise challenges with Private Cloud to Public Cloud solutions.

Even so, there is still quite a bit of work to be done by both HP and their customers. Enterprises are still, in large part, working out how best to leverage cloud-based solutions. In addition, OpenStack has its own set of challenges to become a viable product for the masses. HP’s intent is to bridge the gap between what the enterprise needs and the current state of the technology. Mickos’ new position heading up the Helion division is already starting to turn a battleship in great need to a significant course correction.

On the big data front, HP made a splash in June 2013 with their HAVEn set of core technologies. The idea was to bring the best of both worlds with their acquisitions of Vertica and Autonomy. Since the announcement, the products were perceived to be a grouping of parts rather than a cohesive solution. At Discover Barcelona, HP unveiled their updated branding to Haven that signifies the integration of the products into a more comprehensive solution.

While the marketing is coming together, it is unclear that customers are resonating with the broader appeal of Haven beyond just that of each component. Haven is, however, moving to a Helion application offered in the cloud or on-premises, which could appeal more broadly to enterprise CIOs.

Infrastructure incredibly important

At the conference, HP made it clear that infrastructure remains incredibly important. And from the size of the crowds around their Converged Systems areas, it would seem customers are resonating with the same view. Anecdotally, the hardware areas were the most crowded sections of the exhibit floor.

IMG_0363

Packed within the Converged Systems group is HP’s OneView management platform. Today, OneView presents a management platform for the broader infrastructure platform. However, the real value will come from the ecosystem HP is building around the platform.

A comprehensive management platform is one area that will become increasingly more important for the CIO facing a potpourri of different vendors, providers and solutions.

Devil in the details

Ultimately, for HP, the devil is in the details. For the enterprise CIO, however, HP presents some interesting potential in their portfolio. They do have some formidable challenges ahead as they split in two and bring focus to the enterprise of tomorrow. Neither is easy, but will be interesting to see how HP fares moving forward.

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 12/8/2014

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/12/hp-charts-a-course-for-the-enterprise-cio-from-the-inside-out/

Think you are ready to build a cloud? Think again.

There is plenty of banter about what it truly takes to play in cloud. Do you think you are ready to jump into the deep end? Is your team ready? What about your processes? And finally, is the technology ready to take the leap? Read on before you answer.

Two months ago, I wrote “8 Reasons Not to Move to Cloud” to address the common reasons why organizations are hesitant to move to cloud. This post is geared to address the level one must play if they want to build their own clouds. Having built cloud services myself, I can say from experience that it is not for the faint of heart.

Automation and agility

Traditional corporate infrastructure is typically not automated or agile. Meaning, a change in the requirements or demands may constitute a change in architecture, which in turn, requires a manual change in the configurations. All of this takes time, which works against the real-time expectations of cloud provisioning.

Cloud-based solutions must have some form of automation and agility to address the changing demands coming from customers. Customers expect real-time provisioning of their resources. Speed is key here and only possible with automation. And a prerequisite for automation is standardization.

Standardization is key

The need for standardization is key when building cloud-based solutions. In order to truly enable automation, there must be a level of assumption around hardware configurations, architecture, and logical network. Even relatively small things such as BIOS version, NIC model and patch level can throw havoc into cloud automation. From a corporate perspective, even the same model of server hardware could have different versions of BIOS, NIC and patches.

Add logical configurations such as network topology, and the complexities start to mount. Where are the switches? How is the topology configured? Which protocols are in play for which sections of the network? One can quickly see how a very small hiccup can throw things into whack pretty quickly.

For the average corporate environment, managing physical and logical configurations at this level is challenging. Even for those operating at scale, it is a challenge. This is one reason why those at scale build their own systems; so they can control the details.

The scale problem

At scale, however, the challenge is more than just numbers. Managing at scale requires a different mode of thinking. In a traditional corporate environment, when a server fails, an alert goes off to dispatch someone to replace the failed component. In parallel, the impacted workload is moved or changed to limit the impact to users. These issues can range from a small fire to a three-alarm inferno.

At scale, those processes simply collapse under the stress. This is where operating at scale requires a different mode of thinking. Manual intervention for every issue is not an option.

The operations math problem

First, the cloud architecture must endure multiple hardware failures. Single points of failure must come out of the equation as much as possible. I wrote about this back in 2011 with my post “Clouds, Failure and Other Things That Go Bump in the Night.” This is where we revert to probability and statistics. There will be hardware failures. Even entire data centers will fail. The challenge is how to change out operational thinking to assuming failure. I detail this a bit further in my post “Is the cloud unstable and what can we do about it?

Discipline, discipline, discipline

All of these lead to a required chance in discipline. No longer is one able to simply run into the data center to fix something. No longer are humans able to fix everything manually. In fact, the level of discipline goes way up with cloud. Even the smallest mistake can have cataclysmic consequences. Refer to the November Microsoft Azure outage that was caused by a ‘performance update’. Process, operations, configurations and architectures must all raise their level of discipline.

Consider the consequences

Going full-circle, the question is: Should an enterprise or corporate entity consider building private clouds? For the vast majority of organizations, the answer should be no. But there are exceptions. Refer to my post way back in 2009 on the “Importance of Private Clouds.” Internal private clouds may present challenges for some, but hosted private clouds provide an elegant alternative.

In the end, building clouds are hard and complicated. Is it plausible for an enterprise to build their own cloud? Yes. Typically, it may come as a specific solution to a specific problem. But the hurdle is pretty high…and getting higher every day. Consider the consequences before making the leap.

 

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 12/1/2014

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/12/think-you-are-ready-to-build-a-cloud-think-again/

Will the real change agent please stand up?

For twenty years, IT pitched itself as the ‘change agent’ in the company. More specifically, IT was positioning itself as the provocateur to bring increased value to the company, lines of business through the use of technology.

But is IT really the change agent? And should IT be the change agent? The short answer for many is: No, IT is not the change agent today, but they should be. And the CIO should be the one leading the charge. Refer back to the post ‘Transforming IT Requires a Three-Legged Race’ that details the three components required for change…and the CIO should take the lead. The reality today is that the catalyst of change is coming from groups outside of IT.

For more than three decades, IT has seen a fair number of evolutionary changes. While many of these changes resulted in great improvements for businesses, over the past decade, the IT organization struggled to keep up. Is it evolving? Yes for some, but far too slowly for the vast majority of organizations. And the scary thing is that many IT organizations (and CIOs) are in denial of the problem.

Unfortunately, some outside of IT refer to IT as the ‘department of no’ or ‘where big projects go to die.’ These are actual statements made by company executives when referring to IT. While not a flattering impression of IT, it is a key reason why organizations outside of IT are driving the change.

Velocity of change

Another reason for the discrepancy is due to velocity of change. IT is simply not able to keep up with the onslaught of requests coming from the different lines of business and the rates in the two vectors is creating a growing rift between the two.

Velocity Innovation Change

We can clearly attribute the changes in business change (and customer demand). However, to understand the IT vector, one needs to dig a bit deeper and consider the anthropology of IT. IT has made it their mission to build systems and architectures for growth. The planning did consider scale and agility. The problem is that it did not take into account the rate of scale or worse yet, the requirements around agility. This is the crux of the problem in most technology architectures today.

The technology choices only tell one part of the story. The other two parts deal with process and organizational challenges. The structure of the IT organization has not changed much over the past two decades. Even the processes used to manage demand and change has not evolved much. Mention concepts such as DevOps to some organizations and you might as well be talking in some incomprehensible language. The core issue is that the current state of IT is not in a position to handle the current, let alone future demands coming to its doorstep.

Resistance to change

That seemingly paints a pretty negative view of IT, right? Understanding these issues should push many CIOs and IT organizations to start making the change, right? Unfortunately, it is not that simple. The irony is that the same organizations that see themselves as change agents are viewed, externally, as ultimately resistant to change.

Even today, phrases like “that’s the way we’ve always done it” is still widely in use. The way that solutions are purchased by IT has not changed either. For example, IT organizations are still buying cloud services just like any other enterprise software. From the language used to communicate requirements to the vetting of the solution by asking what hardware the provider is using to the terms used in contract, the examples are widespread.

CIO leadership

It is time to do away with the old way of thinking and start adopting the new ways. That does not mean a wholesale change. It means starting by understanding the changes needed and building a plan of attack. This is where the transformational CIO comes in. Consider the post ‘Three harmonious factors that change the CIO octave’ that outlines the steps to assist the CIO in leading the change.

Does this doom-and-gloom picture represent every IT organization out there? No. There are pockets of success either wholesale or starting the journey of change. The key for the CIO is to start with an outside, objective perspective and conduct a self-evaluation. Do not get defensive. Listen and understand.

From experience, making the change and turning the corner can actually be very liberating. Just be aware that the largest challenge will be the people. This is where the CIO needs to work closely with their team through the process. Team is not an individual sport and this is a great opportunity for the CIO and IT to turn the corner and shine.

Bottom Line: This is the best time to be in IT and to be a CIO. For those that have made the transition, the potential is huge.

 

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 11/24/14

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/11/will-the-real-change-agent-please-stand-up/

5 things that prepare the CIO for innovation

Last week, Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) held their annual re:Invent conference in Las Vegas. Gigaom’s Barb Darrow summarized her Top-5 lessons learned from the conference here. Specifically for CIO’s, there were a number of things coming from the conference that every CIO should take note of. One of those is to prepare for innovation. It is not a matter of if; it is a matter of when.

Innovation is not a destination, but rather a journey. The path is not always rosy and presents a number of challenges along the way. The upside is an outcome that positions the CIO, the IT organization and ultimately the company in a unique position among their competitors.

There are a number of core items that prepare the CIO for advancing down the innovation path:

  1. Keep it simple: The world of Information Technology (IT) is getting complex, far more complex, and not simpler. Yet, the importance to become agile and responsive to changing business demands is ever-present. The IT organization must find ways to streamline their processes across-the-board. We all know the KISS principle.
  2. Create innovative culture: Innovation is not innate for most. Current culture may actually inhibit innovation within the organization. Understand that culture must change. A good friend and CIO, Jag Randhawa wrote the book “The Bright Idea Box: A Proven System to Drive Employee Engagement and Innovation.” Jag outlines a process that he found to be successful and applicable to many different types of organizations.
  3. Avoid constraints: It is easy to find ways to avoid problems. Preparing for innovation can cause disruption. However, questioning the status quo may be exactly what the organization needs. Look for ways to address constraints whether from technology or from conventional thinking.
  4. Find leverage: IT is not able to do everything. In the past, it was necessary for IT to do everything (relatively) since there really was no other alternative. Fast-forward to today and there are many more options available. Identify what is strategic and should be a focus for IT. Find leverage for the other points to avoid distraction and paralysis.
  5. Seek difference: Being different is often a scary proposition. Many see differentiation as a sign of risk. The thinking that there is safety in numbers. But the thinking must change. Differentiation is something not just to be cherished, but sought out! Look for opportunities to change and provide differentiation.

The combination of these mantras set the stage for a different perspective and line of thinking. Are these the end-all, be-all list of steps? No. But they present a good short-list to start with. Start small and do not expect the changes to happen overnight. It will take time and reinforcement.

Many of the discussions taking place last week at AWS re:Invent spoke of innovation and new ways of thinking. They spoke of a future state for IT. Consequently, traditional thinking had a hard time gaining a platform for discussion.

Connecting the dots

Yet, much of the challenge traditional enterprises have is around connecting the dots between current state and future state. For the CIO, setting the stage, cadence and direction is much of the challenge. It is a lot of work, but still needs to be done.

The first step is in setting a vision that aligns with the business strategy. Understand the core business of how the company makes and spends money. Seek out ways to provide innovative solutions. Start out small, learn from the experience and grow. Look for ways to streamline how IT operates and continually improve IT’s position to become more innovative.

Innovation is about the journey, not the destination. Innovation is an opportunity for differentiation that must be accepted and celebrated. Innovation presents a significant opportunity for companies from all industries. And IT plays a key role in driving today’s innovative processes.

 

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 11/18/2014

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/11/5-things-that-prepare-the-cio-for-innovation/

CIOs are getting out of the Data Center business

More than three years ago, a proclamation was made (by myself, Mark Thiele and Jan Wiersma) that the data center was dead. Ironically, all three of us come from an IT background of running data centers within IT organizations.

At the time, it was an event in London, England where the attendees were utterly dumbfounded by such a statement. Keep in mind that this event was also a data center specific event. To many this statement was an act of heresy.

But the statement had truth and the start of a movement already at foot. Ironically, companies in leading roles were already starting down this path. It was just going to take some time before the concept became common thinking. Even today, it still is not common thinking. But the movement is starting to gain momentum. Across the spectrum of industries from healthcare to financial services, CIO’s and their contemporaries are generally making a move away from data centers. Specifically, moving away from managing their own, dedicated corporate data centers.

Enterprise data center assets

And by data center, we are talking about the physical critical facility and equipment that is the data center. We are not talking about the servers, storage or network equipment within the data center facility. These data center assets (the facility) are moving into a new phase of maturity. While still needed, companies are realizing that they no longer need to manage their own critical facilities in order to provide the level of service required.

Moving along the spectrum

As companies look at alternatives to operating their own data centers, there are a number of options available today. For many years, colocation, or the renting of data center space, was the only viable option for most. Today, the options for colocation vary widely as do alternatives in the form of cloud computing. Companies are moving along a spectrum from traditional corporate data centers to public cloud infrastructure.

 

DataCenterCloudSpectrum

It is important to note that companies will not move entire data centers (en masse) from one mode to another. The specific applications, or workloads, will spread across the spectrum with some number leveraging most if not all of the modes. Over time, the distribution of workloads shifts toward the right and away from corporate data centers.

In addition, even those moving across the spectrum may find that they are not able to completely reduce their corporate data center footprint to zero for some time. There may be a number of reasons for this, but none should preclude an effort to reduce the corporate data center footprint.

Additional cloud models

For clarity sake, Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS) are intentionally omitted. Yet, both ultimately play a role in the complexity of planning a holistic cloud strategy. As with any strategy discussion, one needs to consider many factors beyond simply the technology, or in this case facility, when making critical decisions.

Starting with colocation

Last year, I wrote a blog titled “Time to get on the colocation train before it is too late.” The premise was foretelling the impending move from corporate data centers to colocation facilities. While colocation facilities are seeing an uptick in interest, the momentum is only now starting to build.

For many IT organizations, the first step along the spectrum is in moving from their corporate data center to colocation. Moving infrastructure services from one data center to another is not a trivial step, but a very important one. Moving a data center will test an IT organization in many ways that highlight opportunities for improvement in their quest to ultimately leverage cloud computing. One of those is in their ability to fully operate ‘lights out’ or without the ability to physically enter the data center. The reason is that unlike the corporate data center that was down the hall, a colocation facility may physically be 1,000 miles away or more!

Where to go from here

Plan, plan, and plan. Moving a data center can take months to years even with aggressive planning. Start by thinking about what is strategic, differentiating and supports the corporate strategy. Consider the options that exist in both the colocation and cloud marketplace. You might be surprised how far the colocation marketplace has evolved in just the past few years! And that is just the start.

The opportunities for CIO’s and their IT organization are plentiful today. Getting out of the data center business is just one of the first moves that more and more CIO’s are starting to take. Move where it makes sense and seize the opportunity. For those already down this path, the results can be quite liberating!

 

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 11/10/14

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/11/cios-are-getting-out-of-the-data-center-business/

The importance of the long tail and a market of one

One could ask what does marketing have to do with the CIO and the IT organization as a whole? At the IBM Insight conference last week, this very issue came up on my interview on SiliconANGLE’s theCUBE. The short answer is everything. Marketing and the go to market (GTM) strategy are vital to a company’s strategy in delivering solutions.

Align with business

If IT is to play a significant role in a company’s growth, the connection between IT and marketing must get closer. Much closer. Marketing is just one organization that needs the true value of IT to flourish. But marketing is also one organization that is primed today for leveraging technology to further the effectiveness of the marketing efforts.

One challenge facing IT organizations is in their ability to react with speed. Meaning, how agile they are to changing business demands? This isn’t just a problem about technology, but rather one about process and people. There are technology solutions that assist with the move to a more agile organization. However, realize that it is the intersection between technology, people and process that gives many a moment of pause. Today’s problem is with enablement and engagement…and with speed.

Market of one and the long tail

For a long time, the emphasis was in determining the broader market interests. Where were the masses of customers and prospects moving and how could the company get ahead of the needs? Analytics, reports and bright minds were put to task to determine the best direction to take.

Fast forward to just a few short years ago. While mobile phones are not new, the advent of smartphones are relatively new. Couple that with mass adoption and a bevy of apps to do just about whatever is needed. The combination is a potent innovation cocktail that led many a company to righteous fortunes.

What was the secret sauce? And what does this have to do with the modern IT organization? Everything. The reality is that companies are now creating programs that target individuals, not just groups. The world is now about personalization and the market of one.

Technology gets intimate

If that headline doesn’t get your heart racing… The reality is that technology has become very intimate in multiple ways. Personalization and intimacy are hallmarks of today’s wearable device and smartphone. On a smartphone, we choose our own apps, alerts, settings and personalization through custom cases, wallpaper, etc. Wearable devices take it to the next level. Now there are devices that know what activities we do and when. Just think about that for a moment. They are monitoring a suite of sensors to watch our behaviors and provide feedback.

These are just simple examples of how the Internet of Things (IoT) is making its way into our everyday lives. And it is just the start.

Presence and timing

Mobile devices are now able to detect where you are and timing of different activities. For example, stores are able to determine where in the store you’re located and your purchase habits. Should the store offer you a coupon via the app or text message? Would that entice the customer to actually make the purchase they otherwise might have passed over? The concept of presence and timing with regards to mobile and data is becoming even more intertwined.

Putting it together

Bringing things full-circle, addressing the ‘market of one’ is simply not possible using traditional methods. These new ways of customer engagement require new ways of thinking…and new technology methods. Just about every company is moving to a data-centric model. But even that doesn’t tell the whole story.

The challenge is that IT organizations are buckling under the growing complexity. Not only do they need to move to a data-centric model, but fast. As they organize systems, processes and people in such a way, automation and enablement become more of the norm. Think DevOps.

From the IBM Insight conference, it was clear that we are only in the infancy of where our increasingly data-centric world is headed. If we (as CIOs) hope to drive toward a model of extreme customer engagement, change is needed quickly.

Think about it from the other perspective. We (as customers) are looking for personalization to our needs, when we want it. This is a great opportunity for the CIO and IT organization to participate in the process. Remember, it is about the long tail and the market of one.

 

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 11/2/2014

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/11/the-importance-of-the-long-tail-and-a-market-of-one/

 

IBM connects the dots between data, cloud and engagement

At this week’s IBM Insight conference in Las Vegas, IBM brought out the big guns to demonstrate their chops in the data analytics space. Insight is IBM’s conference dedicated to their solutions around data management and analytics. While there are some highlights, other areas are still evolving.

Setting the stage and connecting the dots

Things kicked off with IBM SVP of the Information and Analytics group, Bob Picciano, talking about the important interconnection between data, cloud and engagement.

  • Data is the ‘What’
  • Cloud is the ‘How’
  • Engagement is the ‘Why’

Bob’s messaging paints a good picture of how the technology and data play a central role to the ever-changing IT organization. Engagement is the key to business relationships with customers. The CIO and IT organization need to fully understand how they engage with customers today and how that will evolve over time. Where are the opportunities? How can IT help create deeper relationships with customers? Data and cloud will play a leading role.

Relationships comes in all sizes

The way companies connect with their customers will vary greatly. To that point, there are some core themes here at Insight that mirrors the varied ways. Two of the key areas are social engagement and mobile. Ironically, traffic at the mobile booth seems anemic compared with the social engagement area, which saw constant traffic. In order for IBM to truly capitalize on the changing marketplace mobile will need to take a stronger position.

Getting social, but still a ways to go

Social media plays a central role in customer engagement for many organizations. The impressive thing is that the #IBMInsight hashtag was trending high on Twitter’s list for much of the day. As a data geek, one is always thinking about the value of those metrics. Trending at the top of Twitter is pretty impressive until you start to look at the finer details.

Running data through Tweet Binder provides a bit of clarity (report). Almost 50% of tweeters used Twitter clients for iPhone, iPad or Android speaking to the importance of mobile in social media. Looking a bit further, 61% of tweeters only tweeted a single tweet while 77.51% of tweeters tweeted only one or two times. That is not a good showing for attendees that should be well versed on the impact of social media and demonstrates there is still a ways to go.

Building an ecosystem

Walking the expansive show floor, it is apparent that IBM has worked to build their ecosystem. There are plenty of vendors that provide complementary products based on IBM technology along with plenty of consulting shops too. The interesting point here is that there are not many larger technology companies other than IBM exhibiting. This could be a side effect to IBM’s wide portfolio of services and solutions and a feeling of competitiveness among vendors. Unfortunately, it does not represent the varied needs of the average enterprise customer.

Summary in a nutshell

Putting it all together, IBM is making good waves to support the enterprise around data and analytics. They have made a good start, but still have a ways to go. The solutions still have a traditional IBM ‘feel’ and with rare exceptions span into the newer territories. There was a showing of IBM’s BlueMix platform, but not too much beyond the large enterprise perspective. Even the cloud area competed with the size of the infrastructure areas.

The reality is that turning a company the size of IBM is hard. In addition to size, there are cultures that need adjustment too. But it seems IBM has started to make good strides in some specific areas with ostensibly more to come. It will be interesting to see how IBM addresses solutions going forward and starts to truly pull the different components (data, cloud, engagement) together.

 

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 10/27/14

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/10/ibm-connects-the-dots-between-data-cloud-and-engagement/

There comes a point when it is not just about storage space

Is the difference between cloud storage provides about free space? In a word, no. I wrote about the cloud storage wars and potential bubble here:

The cloud storage wars heat up

http://avoa.com/2014/04/29/the-cloud-storage-wars-heat-up/

4 reasons cloud storage is not a bubble about to pop

http://avoa.com/2014/03/24/4-reasons-cloud-storage-is-not-a-bubble-about-to-pop/

Each of the providers is doing their part to drive value into their respective solutions. To some, value includes the amount of ‘free’ disk space included. Just today, Microsoft upped the ante by offering unlimited free space for their OneDrive and OneDrive for Business solutions.

Is there value in the amount of free space? Maybe, but only to a point. Once they offer an amount above the normal needs (or unlimited), the value becomes a null. I do not have statistics, but would hazard a venture that ‘unlimited’ is more marketing leverage where most users only consume less than 50GB each.

Looking beyond free space

Once a provider offers unlimited storage, one needs to look at the feature/ functionality of the solution. Not all solutions are built the same nor offer similar levels. Enterprise features, integration, ease of use and mobile access are just a few of the differentiators. Even with unlimited storage, if the solution does not offer the feature you need, storage value is greatly diminished.

The big picture

For most, cloud storage is about replacing a current solution. On the surface the amount of free storage is a quick pickup. However, the real issue is in the compatibility and value beyond just the amount of free storage. Does the solution integrate with existing solutions? How broad is their ecosystem? What about Single Sign On (SSO) support? How much work will it take to implement and train users? These are just a few of the factors that must be considered.

 

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 10/27/14

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/10/there-comes-a-point-when-it-is-not-just-about-storage-space/

The enterprise CIO needs a comprehensive strategic plan and quick

Originally posted @ Gigaom Research 10/20/2014

http://research.gigaom.com/2014/10/the-enterprise-cio-needs-a-comprehensive-strategic-plan-and-quick/

There are many who profess to know what goes on within the mind of the CIO and across the IT organization as a whole. The challenge is: If you have not been responsible for the role, it is increasingly difficult to truly understand the complicated world that encompasses enterprise IT organizations. Could they be simplified? In a word, yes. But that is easier said than done. One needs an appreciation for the demands coming from not just technology, but also from other organizations within the company and the IT organization itself. But even that statement does not provide the full depth of the complexity facing today’s CIO.

The CIO balancing act

Today’s CIO is facing a balancing act between legacy solutions, methodologies and the modern-day buzzword bingo. Whether from cloud computing, big data analytics, data center complications, new architectures, new programming languages or just simply (relatively) the changes in the business direction, the complication is far and wide. And even if a CIO agrees and wants to move to a new solution like cloud, there may be other limiting factors to consider.

IT as a strategic weapon

Strategy is not a new or foreign concept to the IT organization. The vast majority of CIOs and IT organizations have a well-defined strategy that outlines how the IT organization supports the company as a whole. At times however, strategy becomes a victim to the interrupt-driven nature of IT requests. Always being one to want to please, the latest request becomes the newest focus for the team.

One opportunity missed by many organizations is how to transition from being the “hero” to being the sought-after strategic weapon for a company. There is a big difference between the two and it resonates greatly on IT’s intrinsic value to the company. The modern-day CIO is shifting from problem solving to providing business leverage. That is not to say that the IT organization gives up the problem solving. It remains, but is table stakes in today’s IT requirements.

Spanning the industries

The shift in thinking is not relegated to a specific region or industry. Silicon Valley, including its wide geography from San Francisco to San Jose, is not alone in the opportunity. Neither are new upstarts in the web scale category. Every single industry and region has the same challenge. Recall that companies operate in a global economy and need to respond accordingly. Eat or be eaten. Even the incumbent is not immune to the changes sitting at the front door.

Cloud implementation v2.0

One way IT organizations are changing the conversation between IT and Line of Business (LoB) teams is in the introduction of cloud computing. Beyond the common use-cases (CRM, HRIS, Email, etc), the implementations vary greatly. One trend coming up is a move to ‘cloud implementation v2.0’. Organizations were quick to try cloud-based services with very mixed results. In many cases, the attempt was fairly haphazard. IT organizations are now stepping back and rethinking their approach to cloud in a more holistic fashion. Where does it apply, how, why and when? But it goes much broader than that.

Shifting gears to focus on data

In order to understand where to apply cloud, understanding the larger objective is critical. This is where data-centric conversations come into play. In the end, it is not just about the application and data, but also about the value to the company. Add in conversations like Big Data, Analytics, Internet of Things (IoT), Industrial Internet and one can see how the complexity just grew exponentially.

The clock is ticking…

The growing complexity for the CIO and IT organization does not translate to more available time. Quite the contrary. The demands that companies are placing on their IT organization are increasing exponentially. This is where a new strategic vision is needed. In order to respond in a timely manner, CIOs will need to rethink their organization, processes, focuses and technology in a holistic manner. It will take time to evolve to the new model. But timing is of the essence. The demand is here today and is only increasing.